Sunday, November 23

Knitting = fun

Since I began knitting seriously, I've been mostly busy figuring out how to knit, counting yards/meters for a project, buying the right set of needles, to understand gauge,... there's a lot to learn when beginning to knit. Since I watched Melody's podcast (she's so sweet, you should really listen to it) I realised that I'm not so fond of superwash yarns anymore. I never really realised what superwash meant. Thanks to her podcast I was suprised to find that all my stash yarn is labeled as a superwash yarn!

I always had a preference for 100% wool yarns. So I was always checking the composition of yarns I bought, to make sure it had organic materials. But 100% wool yarns aren't easy to find in local yarn shops where I live. Occasionally I buy my sock yarn in a lys which always has some polyester/polyamide in it. Then when I found out on internet shops that a lot of yarns, including sock yarn, were full merino I was thrilled! Sadly I now discovered it says superwash on the label too.

But I still think that knitting is fun though. It's just not so easy to buy yarn now anymore. That's a good thing, isn't it? I actually really love all the things I'm learning about knitting and yarn through this knitting community. Without this community I don't think I would have gotten this far with my knitting. It's wonderful to share all these things online and get feedback. So I'd not like to thank Melody alone for pointing me on the superwash thing, but also thanks to all my readers for taking the time to comment and visit my blog. I love reading the comments, they warm my heart and I'm always looking forward to read your blogs and knitting adventures.

 How about you? Are you that strict when it comes to yarn composition? 

16 comments:

  1. It is nice to have yarns that are 100% wool, but for socks I think I prefer if they are superwash, just for durability. What is that lovely booklet you have there?

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    1. Right, sock yarn must be durabele. The booklet is a sketchbook/notebook that's from Mexx. But I hid the brand name with that piece of cardboard and drew a ball of yarn :)

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  2. After working on a pair of socks with leftover yarn for months now I realized it took me so long because I don't like the yarn and that made me wondering what yarns I'd prefer... and by finding out about superwash I found reasons for it.
    I love what you share here.

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    1. Thanks! It's truly by working with lots of different yarns that we learn to appreciate some more than others.

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  3. I tend to go for natural fibers if possible, but since I mainly knit socks I find that having some sort of nylon gives them a nice stretch, and superwash makes them easier to care for - important when I have several pairs and so handwashing each would take forever!

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    1. It's true, I throw my SW socks in the washing machine too. It's easy. I was only suprised that there were chemicals involved in my beautifully soft sock yarn!

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  4. i'm torn between wanting to buy from indie dyers and the fact that 95% of them use super wash (because it takes colors super well). I have though found quite a few brand with 100% natural wool and it's just the best

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  5. I love wool immensely because of the squish factor and that it is the kindest on my hands. Wool blends especially with silk, oh my I do love that a lot!! Super wash is fine with me as well. I dislike working with cotton and acrylic because there is no give whatsoever while knitting and thus causes hand pain.

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    1. I do like cotton for dishcloths or similar projects. Acrylics are definitely a no-no for the same reason as yours!

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  6. I'm still in that stage of determining what yarn I like and what I don't - for a long time I only made blankets with 100% acrylic yarn (from JoAnns or Michaels) but when I decided to try a sweater I bought some "real" yarn for the first time and the difference was night and day. Now I'm trying to find what blends I like best and try some different fibers like cotton, hemp bamboo to see how they knit up too. The learning process is long but so worth it

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    1. That's true, it's only by knitting with different fibers that you learn to appreciate them and know your most preferable yarn to work with.

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  7. I recently learned a little more about superwash as well. I mean, I knew they did *something* to it to make it washable, but I never really thought about what is was. A lot of dyers go with superwash because they don't have to be quite so delicate when dyeing. I have been debating whether or not to keep using it and I don't think I will, even it makes my dye process more time consuming and stressful! If I'm going to take the time to dye something, from plant to fiber like that, I might as well make it as natural as possible and make smart choices all the way.

    I'll probably still buy and use some superwash, especially when knitting gifts for others, but I do try to stick with more pure fibers for my own projects. :)

    (And I noticed Melody did a Podcast! I can't wait to get some time to sit down and listen! Ashley of Woolful is starting up a podcast series I'm excited to check out as well! You should look it up.)

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    1. I stumbled on Woolful via Melody's blog and I'm listening to it right now :)
      I also think, if conscious buying, natural dyeing is your thing, it's worth the stress and time to only work with natural fibers, free from chemicals.

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  8. If I like the way it feels or like the color, I get the yarn. :) I tend to like 100% wool, but I've worked with everything, pretty much. Nothing wrong with superwash yarn, either! You just have to be conscious of what you use it for. I know it tends to make sweaters HUGE after washing them (they can be shrunk back down to size with a short spin in the dryer), but can be great for socks if it has something strong like nylon or silk mixed in.

    I think it's great to try all sorts of different yarns to see what you like best.

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    1. I understand your viewpoint, there is nothing wrong with superwash, I just thought that, apart from the coloring, my wool was 100% natural. Silly though, I should do some more research. I just want to be more conscious about the things I buy or work with.

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  9. I still haven't found the time to sit down and listen to Melody's podcast but you make me even more determined to finally get to it :)
    I like to go as natural as possible when I buy yarn too. I'm curious to learn more about superwash, so far I've only steered clear of acrylics etc.

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I appreciate your comment!